The advance of technology has given many great benefits to both society and science. It has allowed us to automate our labor and systematize research. But moving into new territories has opened new dangers as well as new benefits. The increase of heart disease has become astronomical, and the automation of our lives may be to blame.

Manual Labor Maximized Heart Health

Before the 1900s, the prevalence of heart disease was only present in a few. Now, it is the number one killer in the United States. Prior to the Industrial Revolution, people relied on manual labor to survive. Although this sounds taxing, the lifestyle of walking to work, beating carpets, and washing laundry by hand kept our great-grandparents mostly free of heart disease.

Because higher fat foods were made by hand (think churning butter), they took a great deal of work. This limited the amount of processed foods that were eaten.

The Changing World: Conveniences Not So Convenient After All?

Vacuum cleaners made beating rugs unnecessary, and washing machines meant no more scrubbing by hand. Although these conveniences helped ease many lives, this slowed lifestyle took its toll on many hearts. High-fat foods, like hamburgers, fries and potato chips became staples in the American diet.

Science & Society: Today’s Lifestyle

With these advancing technologies, the scientific community saw the need for advanced understanding of the growing epidemic of heart disease. Thanks to the advance of science, the causes for heart disease are known, and for the most part, the cures are too.

The lifestyle changes that are recommended by the American Heart Associate emphasize a diet rich in vegetables, fruits, and grains, and low in salt, saturated fats, and trans fats. Regular exercise and no tobacco are vital to maintaining a healthy heart. Much of this research has brought us back to a lifestyle that is encouraging us to work both smarter and harder. But when your life is at stake, it’s the best decision you’ll ever make.

Continuing Heart Health

If you are concerned about your heart, and especially if your primary care doctor recommends that you see a cardiologist, contact Dr. Dilip Mathew today. Dr. Mathew is Sarasota’s leading EP doctor and has been performing AF ablations in the Tampa Bay area since 2004.